Moroccan Chicken
AIP,  Dairy Free,  Dinner,  Gluten Free,  Paleo,  Whole 30

Paleo Moroccan Chicken with Red Coleslaw (GF/DF/Paleo/AIP)

Okay I have a secret: I hate long laborious meals. Weird for someone that likes to cook right? I just don’t have the time or patience for it. If it is too complicated, chances are I’m not doing it. Can you relate? That’s why most of my meals are 30 minutes or less, including this super simple super delicious Paleo Moroccan Chicken.

Keys to a Good Marinade

Do you know how to construct the perfect marinade? It’s pretty simple. First, you have to have some type of oil. This really helps the flavors penetrate the meat and goes a long way to flavor it.

Second, you have to have an acid. In this Paleo Moroccan Chicken I used a combination of lemon and vinegar but any acid will work. You could use any citrus or vinegar. The acid helps to really tenderize the meat.

Third, you want to have flavor. Think of the flavor profile you want and run with this. For this recipe I used a blend of ginger, tumeric and cumin. But I’ve also used combinations like lemon garlic and oregano or cilantro, ancho chile powder and garlic. For an asian theme try Tamari, sesame oil and lime. Whatever culinary theme you are going for, just throw some of those flavors in.

Fourth, you want salt. Don’t forget the salt. It really helps flavor the meat.

And that’s it. Now you are an expert at marinades!

The Health Benefits of Red Cabbage

Pair your Paleo Moroccan Chicken with this most amazing sweet and tangy coleslaw and you’ll never go back to that boring old white mix again.

Cabbage is high in antioxidants, polyphenols and sulfuric compounds. Also loaded in vitamin C, vitamin K and folate it’s no wonder cabbage is considered a serious superfood.

Cruciferous veggies like cabbage fight free radicals, lower chronic inflammation, and fight cancer. They improve digestion, keep your heart healthy, and may help to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

And while all types of cabbage are healthy, did you know red cabbage has 30% more antioxidants than it’s green counterpart? Red cabbage is also high in anthocyanins which give it that vibrant purple color. Anthocyanins are in the flavinoid family and have been shown to help protect the heart and reduce overall inflammation. Red cabbage has 36 different types of anthocyanins so eat up!

Moroccan Chicken

Paleo Moroccan Chicken with Red Coleslaw

This easy 30 minute meal is short on time but certainly not short on flavor!
Total Time 30 mins
Course Main Course

Ingredients
  

Moroccan Chicken

  • 3 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 1/4 cup avocado or olive oil
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 tbs apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbs ground ginger
  • 1 tsp ground tumeric
  • 2 tsp ground cumin

Red Coleslaw

  • 1 small head red cabbage, shredded
  • 1 green apple, shredded
  • 2 purple carrots, shredded
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise or olive oil I used homemade mayo using macadamia nut oil
  • 2 tbs honey
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 tsp salt more or less to taste
  • 2 green onion, sliced thin

Instructions
 

Moroccan Chicken

  • Mix all marinade ingredients in a small bowl. Place chicken thighs in a gallon ziploc bag and pour marinade over the top. Marinate at least an hour or overnight.
  • Heat grill to medium high heat. Grill chicken until done, timing will depend on your grill and the size of the thighs but approximately 15 minutes.

Coleslaw

  • Meanwhile, mix cabbage, apple, purple carrots in a large bowl.
  • In a small bowl, whisk mayo/oil, lemon and honey. Pour over the coleslaw and mix well.
  • Serve with coleslaw with chicken and green onions garnished on top.

Notes

Time Saving Tip:  Sometimes I marinate the chicken as I am dethawing it in the sink/fridge to kill 2 birds with 1 stone.
 
Recipe by Liz at https://www.thenutramom.com
moroccan chicken pinterest

References

Journal of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2014. Cruciferous Vegetable Intake Is Inversely Correlated with Circulating Levels of Proinflammatory Markers in Women.

Journal of Nutrition. 2011. Cruciferous Vegetables Have Variable Effects on Biomarkers of Systemic Inflammation in a Randomized Controlled Trial in Healthy Young Adults.

Clinical Phytoscience. 2015. Cruciferous vegetables: prototypic anti-inflammatory food components.

Advances in Nutrition. 2011. Anthocyanins in Cardiovascular Disease.

Circulation. 2013. High anthocyanin intake is associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction in young and middle-aged women.

Front. Oncology. 2017. Inverse Association between Dietary Intake of Selected Carotenoids and Vitamin C and Risk of Lung Cancer.

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